8-Week Spinning Weight Loss Program

8-Week Spinning Weight Loss Program

There’s a reason why indoor cycling is one of the most popular fitness activities: it works! From spin studios to spin bikes in living rooms, it has never been easier to slide into the saddle. Before you clip in, it always helps to have a plan, especially if your goal is to lose weight.

How spinning helps with weight loss


Indoor cycling is a great part of a weight loss plan. If you ask anyone who’s hit up a spin class before what it’s like, they’ll probably say it was intense and very, very sweaty. And while there are many factors at play with any weight loss journey, indoor cycling shines as a cardiovascular exercise that can help you build strength in your muscles while burning calories.

As with any regular cardio exercise, regular spinning can help lower blood pressure, insulin levels, and your resting heart rate. But how effective spinning is for helping you meet your fitness goals depends on the effort you put into it. For example, if you don’t touch the resistance knob, you won’t feel the burn or see the benefits.

Cycling also helps kick your metabolism into action. That said, if you want to see weight loss results, you can’t use your morning ride as an excuse to lounge away the rest of the day and eat like a raccoon who’s been set free in the freezer section. Spin class on its own won’t magically shrink your waistline–it’s just one part of a healthy lifestyle.

How many calories can you burn with spinning?


The number of calories you’ll burn on the bike will depend on the effort you put in while you’re on the spinning bike and how long you ride for. (Quelle surprise!) Estimates vary pretty widely because only you know the most important part of the equation–how hard are you going to work?–but you could burn anywhere from 400 to 600 calories per 45 minute session, depending on your weight and workout intensity. 

How many times a week do you need to spin to lose weight?


It all depends on where you’re starting from. If you’re new to cycling and just setting out on your fitness journey, spinning once a week is better than not moving at all. The results you’ll see will be a direct result of the effort you put in. 

Aiming to exercise a little bit 5 to 6 days a week is a great goal, but if that starts at 1 to 3 days, you might see results right off the bat with just a few 30-minute workouts a week. 

How much weight can you lose in a week spinning?


Ultimately, how much weight you’ll lose depends on your nutrition plan, the effort put into your rides, and if you’re combining spinning with any other exercise like strength training to build muscle mass. That said, with a healthy fitness plan, you could lose up to a pound per week on average if you maintain consistency, a healthy lifestyle, and a calorie deficit. 

Will spinning 3 times a week help you lose weight?


Ideally, with regular exercise and healthy eating, if you push the pedals for 30 minutes 3 times per week, spinning could help you lose half a pound to 1 pound per week if you maintain a calorie deficit and eat healthy.

How much weight can you lose spinning for a month?


If you maintain a healthy diet and spin 4 times per week, you could lose up anywhere from 2 to 4 pounds per week. It all depends on the effort you put into your workout, and if you’re fueling your body for the ride.

Can spinning help you lose belly fat?


Spot weight loss, where you target one area of your body to lose fat from, is a myth. Cycling does burn calories, however, which can contribute to overall weight loss. With consistency, you can gradually lose weight all over.

What makes a spin bike special compared to your average stationary bike? Find out here. 

Why spinning is such good exercise


Of all of the ways to add cardio exercise into your fitness routine, cycling and at-home spinning have some major benefits.
 

Your joints will thank you


The number one edge that spin class has over other forms of cardiovascular exercise is that it’s very easy on the joints. Compared to running, which is often called ‘pounding the pavement’ or ‘hitting the road,’ cycling is a low impact workout. For anyone with pain or mobility issues, spinning can be an incredible way to feel the burn without burning through the cartilage in your joints.

Indoor cycling can even improve your joint functions. The continuous full-range movement through your legs produces synovial fluids, a thick liquid between the joints, which helps keep them lubricated. 

Core conditioning


Beyond giving your heart and lungs a workout, cycling has the unique benefit of helping to strengthen your core. As you keep your body in the upright position and move your legs, you’re strengthening your abdominal and stabilizing muscles. As long as you maintain good form, your core will be supporting every movement on the bike, protecting you from straining your lower back. 

Lower-body strength builder


Cycling is also a great lower-body workout, building strength and muscle in your legs. When you turn up the resistance, your hamstrings, calves and glutes will get a muscle-building workout. Just how much benefit you’ll see will depend on how much you push yourself to ‘climb hills,’ but you’ll be rewarded if you do. More muscle helps each workout and helps boost your metabolism. 

Spinning is a beginner-friendly workout


Starting spinning at home or in the studio is as easy as riding a bike. Spinning bikes allow you to adjust the intensity to where you’re at in your fitness journey. Spinning has incredible cardiovascular health benefits no matter what level you’re at. 

The cardio-strength combo effect


Any exercise done in isolation is fine, but to see real physical benefits, spinning must be done alongside other healthy habits. If you want to get the most out of your spin session, you’ll need to do more than just indoor cycling.

Adding some strength resistance training to your fitness regimen will help build muscle, and yoga is a great option for stretching it out after being in the cycling position. Yoga also helps to build those stabilizing muscles that help make your ride more powerful. Finally, you can't out-train a bad diet. All the cycling in the world won’t make much of a difference with losing weight if you aren’t fuelling your body properly.

How to get started with spinning at home

You might be surprised how little it takes to get started with spinning at home. With a little bit of gear and a lot of motivation, you can start cycling your way to your fitness goals today. 

What you need to spin


1. A stationary spin bike

This is sort of self explanatory because it’s hard to spin at home if you don’t have a stationary spin bike. This is arguably the only piece of equipment you need to get started. You’ll want to find a spin bike with a fully adjustable padded seat and handlebars, because if it’s not comfortable, you won’t do it. It should also have multiple resistance levels and a frame that can support your weight. 


For apartment-dwellers or late-night riders with housemates, spin bikes with magnetic mechanisms can help keep things quiet while you get your sweat on. In any case, you’ll want a bike with a water bottle holder and a monitor so you’re not having to spend money on extra components down the line.

2. The right footwear

While not technically necessary, the right footwear can make a world of difference when you start spinning. If your feet aren’t having fun, you won’t be either.

Clip-in shoes connect you to the bike, allowing you to transmit way more power into every stride and climb. That means more effective pedaling, so you get more out of every minute. Not worrying about your foot sliding out, or whether that’s a blister forming on your heel might seem minor, but it makes a big difference to your workout.

3. Standard workout gear


As with every intense workout, you’re going to want to be prepared to sweat. That means keeping plenty of water on hand, a towel, and breathable clothing.

Once you’ve got the gear, you just have to set your bike up by checking that the seat is the right height and far enough forward, and that the handlebars are at the right height for you, with your elbows at a slight angle in the seated position.

Our 8-week spinning weight loss program

Variety is the spice of life, and spicy spin sessions are the key to seeing results. This program is full of different types of rides, because variation is key to working different parts of your body and seeing the best results over time.By alternating bursts of resistance and speed, you’ll elevate your heart rate and induce EPOC (Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption) or “the Afterburn Effect”. This is when you trigger post-exercise oxygen consumption causing your body to burn more calories for a few hours after exercise. As you go through this program, remember that speed doesn’t mean a better workout—the resistance knob is your friend.

Start with the beginner workouts, then mix and match workouts aiming to spin 3-4 times per week over the course of 2 months. Your RPE is your ‘rated perceived exertion,’ so ask yourself while you ride how much you’re exerting yourself on a scale of 1-10 where 1 is ‘very light,’ ⅘ is ‘moderate,’ and 10 is giving it your all. 

  

Beginner spin workout 1

  • 5 minutes - warm up at low resistance

  • 3 minutes - increase resistance to RPE 5

  • 2 minutes - increase resistance level again, so you’re at RPE 6

  • 3 minutes - decrease resistance to RPE 5

  • 2 minutes - increase resistance to RPE 6

  • 5 minutes - cooldown to comfortable resistance (try for RPE 4)

Beginner spin workout 2

  • 5 minutes - warm up at low resistance

  • 10-20 minutes - increase resistance to RPE 5

  • 5 minutes - cool down 

Interval spin workout 1

  • 5 minutes - warm up at low resistance

  • 30 seconds - pedal hard at a higher resistance level, then reduce resistance to set a moderate pace for 30 seconds. Repeat 4 times

  • 1 minute - reduce resistance to an easy pace

  • 1 minute - increase resistance and pedal hard then reduce resistance to set a moderate pace for 30 seconds. Repeat 4 times.

  • 1 minute - reduce resistance to an easy pace

  • 45 seconds - increase resistance and go all out, then reduce resistance to set an easy pace for 15 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

  • 2 minutes - maintain an easy pace

  • 5 minutes - cool down

Interval spin workout 2

  • 5 minutes - warm up at RPE 5

  • 5 minutes - switch to a moderate resistance level and pick up the pace at RPE 7

  • 5 minutes - change to heavy resistance and slow your pace at RPE 8

  • 5 minutes - maintain heavy resistance and slow down again to RPE 7

  • 5 minutes - shift to light resistance and pedal faster at RPE 5

  • 5 minutes - move to moderate resistance and speed up at RPE 6

  • 5 minutes - move back to heavy resistance and slow down at RPE 7

  • 5 minutes - speed up at a moderate resistance at RPE 6

  • 5 minutes - shift back to heavy resistance and slow down at RPE 8

  • 5 minutes - choose a light resistance and pedal faster at RPE 5 to cool down

Interval spin workout 3

  • 5 minutes - warm up at RPE 3

  • 30 seconds - sprint at high resistance aiming for RPE 7-8.5

  • 30 seconds - slow down, switch to moderate resistance level, aiming for RPE 3-5 

  • 30 seconds - sprint at high resistance at RPE 7-8.5

  • 1 minute - recover at moderate resistance and slow down at RPE 3-5

  • 45 seconds - high resistance sprint at RPE 7-8.5

  • 1 minute - return to moderate resistance and slow down

  • 45 seconds – go back to high resistance and sprint. RPE 7 to 8.5

  • 1 minute – return to a moderate resistance level and slow down. RPE 3 to 4.

  • 1 minute – change to high resistance and sprint. RPE 7 to 8.5

  • Repeat the last 2 steps 7times

  • 4 minutes – switch to a low resistance level to cool down. RPE 3.

HIIT spin workout 1

  • 5 minutes -  warm-up at a moderate resistance level.

  • 30 seconds – set the bike to high resistance and pedal hard, then shift down to low resistance for 1 minute. Repeat 4 times.

  • 40 seconds – shift back to high resistance and go hard, then change to low resistance for 1 minute. Repeat 4 times.

  • 30 seconds – return to high resistance and pedal hard, then shift down to low resistance for 1 minute. Repeat 4 times.

HIIT spin workout 2

  • 5 minutes – start at a very low resistance level and warm-up to a beginning resistance level.

  • 45 to 60 seconds – set to high resistance level and pedal as fast as you can.

  • 45 to 60 seconds – reduce resistance to a low level and slow down to catch your breath and recover.

  • Repeat the last 2 steps 20 times.

HIIT spin workout 3

  • 10 minutes - warm-up at a low resistance level.

  • 30 seconds – shift to a high resistance level and pedal as hard as you can.

  • 60 seconds – change resistance to a moderate level and slow your pace.

  • Repeat the last 2 steps 4 times.

  • 4 minutes – switch to low resistance and pedal slowly to recover.

  • Repeat all but the warm-up 2 more times.

  • 5 minutes – on low resistance, pedal easy to cool down.

Remember, the home workout is the one you actually do. Check out our collection of exercise bikes today to start burning calories with these DIY at home spin classes.

And as Freddie Mercury would say, get on your bikes and ride!